Impact of dietary and obesity genetic risk scores on weight gain.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3D45D9B2B0E1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Impact of dietary and obesity genetic risk scores on weight gain.
Journal
The American journal of clinical nutrition
Author(s)
Baratali L., Mean M., Marques-Vidal P.
ISSN
1938-3207 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0002-9165
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/04/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Whether genetic background and/or dietary behaviors influence weight gain in middle-aged subjects is debated.
To assess whether genetic background and/or dietary behaviors are associated with changes in obesity markers (BMI, weight, and waist and hip circumferences) in a Swiss population-based cohort.
Cross-sectional and prospective (follow-up of 5.3 y) study. Two obesity genetic risk scores (GRS) based on 31 or 68 single nucleotide polymorphisms were used. Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative FFQ. Three dietary patterns "Meat & fries" (unhealthy), "Fruits & vegetables" (healthy), and "Fatty & sugary" (unhealthy), and 3 dietary scores (2 Mediterranean and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index [AHEI]) were computed.
On cross-sectional analysis (N = 3033, 53.2% females, 58.4 ± 10.6 y), obesity markers were positively associated with unhealthy dietary patterns and GRS, and negatively associated with healthy dietary scores and patterns. On prospective analysis (N = 2542, 54.7% females, age at baseline 58.0 ± 10.4 y), the AHEI and the "Fruits & vegetables" pattern were negatively associated with waist circumference gain: multivariate-adjusted average ± SE 0.96 ± 0.25 compared with 0.11 ± 0.26 cm (P for trend 0.044), and 1.14 ± 0.26 compared with -0.05 ± 0.26 cm (P for trend 0.042) for the first and fourth quartiles of the AHEI and the "Fruits & vegetables" pattern, respectively. Similar inverse associations were obtained for changes in waist >5 cm: multivariate-adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.65 (0.50, 0.85) and 0.67 (0.51, 0.89) for the fourth versus the first quartile of the AHEI and the "Fruits & vegetables" dietary pattern, respectively. No associations were found between GRS and changes in obesity markers, and no significant gene-diet interactions were found.
Dietary intake, not GRS, are associated with waist circumference in middle-aged subjects living in Lausanne, Switzerland.
Keywords
dietary intake, gene-diet interactions, obesity, prospective study, weight gain
Pubmed
Create date
04/05/2021 9:34
Last modification date
07/05/2021 6:36
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