Impact of smoking on sleep macro- and microstructure.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_31BE761E843F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Impact of smoking on sleep macro- and microstructure.
Journal
Sleep medicine
Author(s)
Truong M.K., Berger M., Haba-Rubio J., Siclari F., Marques-Vidal P., Heinzer R.
ISSN
1878-5506 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1389-9457
Publication state
Published
Issued date
28/05/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
84
Pages
86-92
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Existing data suggest that smoking may be associated with sleep disturbances. This study aimed to determine the association between smoking and both subjective and objective sleep quality.
Cross-sectional analysis of sleep characteristics in 3233 participants from the population-based CoLaus-HypnoLaus cohort (52.2% women, mean age 56.6 ± 10.2 years) who completed questionnaires on sleep quality, of whom 1489 (46%) had a full polysomnography. Smoking data were self-reported; participants were classified by smoking status as current, former or never smokers. Primary outcomes were subjective sleep quality assessed by sleep questionnaires, and objective sleep quality based on polysomnography (sleep macrostructure), including power spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram on C4 electrode (sleep microstructure), quantifying the relative amount of delta power (1-4 Hz), a marker of sleep depth, and arousal-associated alpha power (8-12 Hz).
Current smokers had a shift toward faster sleep electroencephalogram activity with lower delta power in non-REM sleep compared with former and never smokers (-2.8 ± 0.4% and -2.4 ± 0.4%, respectively; both p < 0.001) and higher alpha power (+0.8 ± 0.2%; p < 0.001) compared with never smokers. There was a dose-dependent negative association between electroencephalogram delta power and smoking intensity (r <sup>2</sup> = -1.2 [-1.9, -0.5]; p = 0.001). Additionally, mean nocturnal oxygen saturation was lower in current smokers.
Current smokers had decreased objective sleep quality, with a dose-dependent association between smoking intensity and decrease in electroencephalogram delta power during non-REM sleep, in addition to an increase in alpha power. Considering the importance of sleep quality for wellbeing and health, these results provide further data to support smoking cessation.
Keywords
Delta power, Polysomnography, Power spectral analysis, Sleep quality, Sleep structure, Smoking
Pubmed
Create date
28/06/2021 12:01
Last modification date
06/07/2021 6:35
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