Exposure to field vs. storage wheat dust: different consequences on respiratory symptoms and immune response among grain workers.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 2018_Barrea_Exposure_IntArchOccupEnviron_postprint_final.pdf (1930.82 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D11C396C227A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Exposure to field vs. storage wheat dust: different consequences on respiratory symptoms and immune response among grain workers.
Périodique
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Auteur(s)
Barrera Coralie, Wild Pascal, Dorribo Victor, Savova-Bianchi Dessislava, Laboissière Audrey, Pralong Jacques A., Danuser Brigitta, Krief Peggy, Millon Laurence, Reboux Gabriel, Niculita-Hirzel Hélène
ISSN
1432-1246 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0340-0131
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
08/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
91
Numéro
6
Pages
745-757
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The aim of this study was to understand the differential acute effects of two distinct wheat-related dusts, such as field or stored wheat dust handling, on workers' health and how those effects evolved at 6 month intervals.
Exposure, work-related symptoms, changes in lung function, and blood samples of 81 workers handling wheat and 61 controls were collected during the high exposure season and 6 months after. Specific IgG, IgE, and precipitins against 12 fungi isolated from wheat dust were titrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay, and electrosyneresis. The level of fungi was determined in the workers' environment. Levels of exhaled fraction of nitrogen monoxide (F <sub>E</sub> NO) and total IgE were obtained. Exposure response associations were investigated by mixed logistic and linear regression models.
The recent exposure to field wheat dust was associated with a higher prevalence for five of six self-reported airway symptoms and with a lower F <sub>E</sub> NO than those in the control population. Exposure to stored wheat dust was only associated with cough. No acute impact of exposure on respiratory function was observed. Exposure to field wheat dust led to workers' sensitization against the three field fungi Aureobasidum, Cryptococcus, and Phoma, although exposure to storage wheat dust was associated with tolerance. The level of Ig remained stable 6 months after exposure.
The clinical picture of workers exposed to field or storage wheat dust differed. The systematic characterization of the aerosol microbial profile may help to understand the reasons for those differences.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aerosols/adverse effects, Agricultural Workers' Diseases/etiology, Agricultural Workers' Diseases/physiopathology, Air Pollutants, Occupational/adverse effects, Antigens, Fungal/blood, Dust/analysis, Edible Grain, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Fungi, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Nitric Oxide/analysis, Occupational Exposure/adverse effects, Occupational Exposure/analysis, Respiratory Function Tests, Respiratory Tract Diseases/etiology, Respiratory Tract Diseases/physiopathology, Switzerland, Triticum/adverse effects, Cattle raisers, Fungi-specific immunoglobulins, Grain workers, Occupational wheat dust exposure, Respiratory symptoms
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
31/05/2018 18:18
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:51
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