Timing malaria transmission with mosquito fluctuations.

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ID Serval
serval:BIB_C7362DDFB8BC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Lettre (letter): communication adressée à l'éditeur.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Timing malaria transmission with mosquito fluctuations.
Périodique
Evolution Letters
Auteur(s)
Pigeault R., Caudron Q., Nicot A., Rivero A., Gandon S.
ISSN
2056-3744 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2056-3744
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
08/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2
Numéro
4
Pages
378-389
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Temporal variations in the activity of arthropod vectors can dramatically affect the epidemiology and evolution of vector-borne pathogens. Here, we explore the "Hawking hypothesis", which states that these pathogens may evolve the ability to time investment in transmission to match the activity of their vectors. First, we use a theoretical model to identify the conditions promoting the evolution of time-varying transmission strategies in pathogens. Second, we experimentally test the "Hawking hypothesis" by monitoring the within-host dynamics of <i>Plasmodium relictum</i> throughout the acute and the chronic phases of the bird infection. We detect a periodic increase of parasitemia and mosquito infection in the late afternoon that coincides with an increase in the biting activity of its natural vector. We also detect a positive effect of mosquito bites on <i>Plasmodium</i> replication in the birds both in the acute and in the chronic phases of the infection. This study highlights that <i>Plasmodium</i> parasites use two different strategies to increase the match between transmission potential and vector availability. We discuss the adaptive nature of these unconditional and plastic transmission strategies with respect to the time scale and the predictability of the fluctuations in the activity of the vector.
Mots-clé
Hawking hypothesis, cinderella hypothesis, circadian rhythm, periodicity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
06/09/2018 17:53
Dernière modification de la notice
10/05/2019 7:08
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