The stationary distribution of a continuously varying strategy in a class-structured population under mutation-selection-drift balance.

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8D290828E8E8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The stationary distribution of a continuously varying strategy in a class-structured population under mutation-selection-drift balance.
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Lehmann L.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
25
Numéro
4
Pages
770-787
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Many traits and/or strategies expressed by organisms are quantitative phenotypes. Because populations are of finite size and genomes are subject to mutations, these continuously varying phenotypes are under the joint pressure of mutation, natural selection and random genetic drift. This article derives the stationary distribution for such a phenotype under a mutation-selection-drift balance in a class-structured population allowing for demographically varying class sizes and/or changing environmental conditions. The salient feature of the stationary distribution is that it can be entirely characterized in terms of the average size of the gene pool and Hamilton's inclusive fitness effect. The exploration of the phenotypic space varies exponentially with the cumulative inclusive fitness effect over state space, which determines an adaptive landscape. The peaks of the landscapes are those phenotypes that are candidate evolutionary stable strategies and can be determined by standard phenotypic selection gradient methods (e.g. evolutionary game theory, kin selection theory, adaptive dynamics). The curvature of the stationary distribution provides a measure of the stability by convergence of candidate evolutionary stable strategies, and it is evaluated explicitly for two biological scenarios: first, a coordination game, which illustrates that, for a multipeaked adaptive landscape, stochastically stable strategies can be singled out by letting the size of the gene pool grow large; second, a sex-allocation game for diploids and haplo-diploids, which suggests that the equilibrium sex ratio follows a Beta distribution with parameters depending on the features of the genetic system.
Mots-clé
Animals, Biological Evolution, Game Theory, Genetic Drift, Genetics, Population, Models, Genetic, Mutation, Selection, Genetic
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/01/2012 1:24
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:15
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