Long live the queen: studying aging in social insects

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_FF45BD96D7CB
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Long live the queen: studying aging in social insects
Périodique
Age
Auteur(s)
Jemielity S., Chapuisat M., Parker J. D., Keller L.
ISSN
0161-9152
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
3
Pages
241-248
Langue
anglais
Notes
121PM
Résumé
Aging is a fascinating, albeit controversial, chapter in biology. Few other subjects have elicited more than a century of ever-increasing scientific interest. In this review, we discuss studies on aging in social insects, a group of species that includes ants and termites, as well as certain bee and wasp species. One striking feature of social insects is the lifespan of queens (reproductive females), which can reach nearly 30 years in some ant species. This is over 100 times the average lifespan of solitary insects. Moreover, there is a tremendous variation in lifespan among castes, with queens living up to 500 times longer than males and 10 times longer than workers (non-reproductive individuals). This lifespan polymorphism has allowed researchers to test the evolutionary theory of aging and Y more recently Y to investigate the proximate causes of aging. The originality of these studies lies in their use of naturally evolved systems to address questions related to aging and lifespan determination that cannot be answered using the conventional model organisms.
Mots-clé
aging disposable soma evolutionary theory social insects division-of-labor life-span drosophila-melanogaster superoxide-dismutase correlated responses natural-selection evolutionary-theories artificial selection oxidative stress juvenile-hormone
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 19:39
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:29
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