Dissociation of spatial memory systems in Williams syndrome.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_FB1B0541733F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Dissociation of spatial memory systems in Williams syndrome.
Périodique
Hippocampus
Auteur(s)
Bostelmann M., Fragnière E., Costanzo F., Di Vara S., Menghini D., Vicari S., Lavenex P., Lavenex P.B.
ISSN
1098-1063 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1050-9631
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
11
Pages
1192-1203
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic deletion syndrome, is characterized by severe visuospatial deficits affecting performance on both tabletop spatial tasks and on tasks which assess orientation and navigation. Nevertheless, previous studies of WS spatial capacities have ignored the fact that two different spatial memory systems are believed to contribute parallel spatial representations supporting navigation. The place learning system depends on the hippocampal formation and creates flexible relational representations of the environment, also known as cognitive maps. The spatial response learning system depends on the striatum and creates fixed stimulus-response representations, also known as habits. Indeed, no study assessing WS spatial competence has used tasks which selectively target these two spatial memory systems. Here, we report that individuals with WS exhibit a dissociation in their spatial abilities subserved by these two memory systems. As compared to typically developing (TD) children in the same mental age range, place learning performance was impaired in individuals with WS. In contrast, their spatial response learning performance was facilitated. Our findings in individuals with WS and TD children suggest that place learning and response learning interact competitively to control the behavioral strategies normally used to support human spatial navigation. Our findings further suggest that the neural pathways supporting place learning may be affected by the genetic deletion that characterizes WS, whereas those supporting response learning may be relatively preserved. The dissociation observed between these two spatial memory systems provides a coherent theoretical framework to characterize the spatial abilities of individuals with WS, and may lead to the development of new learning strategies based on their facilitated response learning abilities.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Choice Behavior, Cues, Feedback, Psychological, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Reward, Space Perception, Spatial Learning, Spatial Memory, Spatial Navigation, Speech Perception, Williams Syndrome/psychology, Young Adult, genetic disorder, hippocampus, place learning, response learning, striatum
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
26/07/2017 17:48
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:26
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