Estimating the contribution of occupational solar ultraviolet exposure to skin cancer

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_FA17EFCAA660.P001.pdf (875.58 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_FA17EFCAA660
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Estimating the contribution of occupational solar ultraviolet exposure to skin cancer
Périodique
British Journal of Dermatology
Auteur(s)
Milon Antoine, Bulliard Jean-Luc, Vuilleumier Laurent, Danuser Brigitta, Vernez David
ISSN
1365-2133 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0007-0963
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
170
Numéro
1
Pages
157-164
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light is the main causative factor for skin cancer. Outdoor workers are at particular risk because they spend long working hours outside, may have little shade available and be bound to take their lunch at their workplace. Despite epidemiological evidence of a doubling in risk of squamous cell carcinoma in outdoor workers, the recognition of skin cancer as an occupational disease remains scarce.
OBJECTIVE: To assess occupational solar UV doses and its contribution to skin cancer risk.
METHODS: A numerical model (SimUVEx) was used to assess occupational and lunch break exposures, characterize exposure patterns and anatomical distribution. Risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was estimated from an existing epidemiological model.
RESULTS: Horizontal body locations received 2.0-2.5 times more UV than vertical locations. Dose associated to lunch outdoor every day was similar to outdoor work one day per week but only half of a seasonal worker. Outdoor workers are associated with an increased risk of SCC but also of frequent acute episodes.
CONCLUSION: Occupational solar exposure contributes largely to the overall lifetime UV dose, resulting in an excess risk of SCC. The magnitude of the estimated excess in risk supports the recognition of SCC as an occupational disease.
Mots-clé
Skin Neoplasms , Occupational Exposure , Ultraviolet Rays , Models, Biological ,
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/09/2013 16:28
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 3:46
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