Les nouveaux agents volatils halogénés en neuro-anesthésie: quelle place pour le sévoflurane ou le desflurane [Newer inhalation anaesthetics and neuro-anaesthesia: what is the place for sevoflurane or desflurane?]

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F93C893B10F2
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Les nouveaux agents volatils halogénés en neuro-anesthésie: quelle place pour le sévoflurane ou le desflurane [Newer inhalation anaesthetics and neuro-anaesthesia: what is the place for sevoflurane or desflurane?]
Périodique
Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation
Auteur(s)
De Deyne C., Joly L.M., Ravussin P.
ISSN
0750-7658
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Numéro
4
Pages
367-374
Langue
français
Notes
English Abstract Journal Article Review --- Old month value: Apr
Résumé
The effects on cerebral circulation and metabolism of sevoflurane and desflurane are largely comparable to isoflurane. Both induce a direct vasodilation of the cerebral vessels, resulting in a less pronounced decrease in cerebral blood flow compared to the decrease in cerebral metabolism. This direct vasodilation seems to be dose-dependent and more pronounced for desflurane > isoflurane > sevoflurane. Many reports suggest luxury perfusion at high concentrations of desflurane. Sevoflurane maintains intact cerebral autoregulation up to 1.5 MAC. Desflurane induces a significant impairment in autoregulation, with a completely abolished autoregulation at 1.5 MAC. Both sevoflurane and desflurane (up to 1.5 MAC) maintain normal CO(2) regulation. As to their effect on final intracranial pressure (ICP), both sevoflurane and desflurane revealed no increases in ICP. However, compared to intravenous hypnotics, subdural ICP is higher with volatiles because of their tendency to increase cerebral swelling after dura opening (isoflurane > sevoflurane). Several case reports have noted seizure-like movements, as well as EEG recorded seizures during induction of sevoflurane anesthesia. Especially, in children during inhalational induction with hyperventilation at a high sevoflurane concentration, severe epileptiform EEG with a hyperdynamic response were observed, which urges for caution using inhalational sevoflurane induction in children for neurosurgical procedures. Neuroprotective properties (reduced neuronal death either by necrosis or apoptosis) have been attributed to all volatile agents. However, these neuroprotective effects have been described in experimental or animal models, so their possible effect on humans remains to be proven.
Mots-clé
Anesthesia, Inhalation, Anesthetics, Inhalation/pharmacology, Animals, Brain Chemistry/drug effects, Humans, Isoflurane/analogs &amp, derivatives, Methyl Ethers, Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology, Neurosurgical Procedures
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
17/01/2008 17:20
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:53
Données d'usage