Intermittent theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of Parkinson disease.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F8FC9F614CF8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Intermittent theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of Parkinson disease.
Périodique
Neurology
Auteur(s)
Benninger D.H., Berman B.D., Houdayer E., Pal N., Luckenbaugh D.A., Schneider L., Miranda S., Hallett M.
ISSN
1526-632X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-3878
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
76
Numéro
7
Pages
601-609
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, N.I.H., IntramuralPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the safety and efficacy of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) in the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD).
BACKGROUND: Progression of PD is characterized by the emergence of motor deficits, which eventually respond less to dopaminergic therapy and pose a therapeutic challenge. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in improving gait, a major cause of disability, and may provide a therapeutic alternative. iTBS is a novel type of rTMS that may be more efficacious than conventional rTMS.
METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study, we investigated safety and efficacy of iTBS of the motor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices in 8 sessions over 2 weeks (evidence Class I). Assessment of safety and clinical efficacy over a 1-month period included timed tests of gait and bradykinesia, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and additional clinical, neuropsychological, and neurophysiologic measures.
RESULTS: We investigated 26 patients with mild to moderate PD: 13 received iTBS and 13 sham stimulation. We found beneficial effects of iTBS on mood, but no improvement of gait, bradykinesia, UPDRS, and other measures. EEG/EMG monitoring recorded no pathologic increase of cortical excitability or epileptic activity. Few reported discomfort or pain and one experienced tinnitus during real stimulation.
CONCLUSION: iTBS of the motor and prefrontal cortices appears safe and improves mood, but failed to improve motor performance and functional status in PD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that iTBS was not effective for gait, upper extremity bradykinesia, or other motor symptoms in PD.
Mots-clé
Aged, Double-Blind Method, Electroencephalography, Electromyography, Evoked Potentials, Motor/physiology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Cortex/physiopathology, Neuropsychological Tests, Parkinson Disease/physiopathology, Parkinson Disease/therapy, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Theta Rhythm/physiology, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation/methods
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/10/2012 10:44
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:53
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