Short-term increase in particulate matter blunts nocturnal blood pressure dipping and daytime urinary sodium excretion

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F84D6A7C8903
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Short-term increase in particulate matter blunts nocturnal blood pressure dipping and daytime urinary sodium excretion
Périodique
Hypertension
Auteur(s)
Tsai Dai-Hua, Riediker Michael, Wuerzner Grégoire, Maillard Marc, Marques-Vidal Pedro, Paccaud Fred, Vollenweider Peter, Burnier Michel, Bochud Murielle
ISSN
1524-4563 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0194-911X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
60
Numéro
4
Pages
1061-1069
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Résumé
Short-term exposure to ambient particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters<10 µm were found to be positively associated with blood pressure. Yet, little information exists regarding the association between particles and circadian rhythm of blood pressure. Hence, we analyzed the association of exposure to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters<10 µm on the day of examination and ≤7 days before with ambulatory blood pressure and with sodium excretion in 359 adults from the general population using multiple linear regression. After controlling for potential confounders, a 10-µg/m3 increase in particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters<10 µm levels was associated with nighttime systolic blood pressure (β=1.32 mm Hg 95% CI, 0.06-2.58 mm Hg at lag 0; P=0.04), nighttime diastolic blood pressure (0.72 mm Hg 95% CI, 0.03-1.42 mm Hg at lag 2; P=0.04), nocturnal systolic blood pressure dipping (-0.96 mm Hg 95% CI, -1.89 to -0.03 mm Hg at lag 0; P=0.044), and daytime urinary sodium excretion (-0.05 log-mmol/min 95% CI, -0.10 to -0.01 log-mmol/min at lag 0; P=0.027) but not with nighttime sodium excretion. The associations with blood pressure rapidly diminished with increasing lag days, and the associations with daytime sodium excretion were maximal with particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters<10 µm in exposures 2 to 5 days before. The associations of short-term increases in particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters<10 µm with higher nighttime blood pressure and blunted systolic blood pressure dipping were preceded by associations with reduced ability of the kidney to excrete sodium during daytime. The underlying mechanism linking air pollution to increased cardiovascular risk may include disturbed circadian rhythms of renal sodium handling and blood pressure.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Air Pollutants/toxicity, Blood Pressure/physiology, Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory, Circadian Rhythm/physiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Particulate Matter, Sodium/urine
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
23/11/2012 12:23
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 3:41
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