Tree cover at fine and coarse spatial grains interacts with shade tolerance to shape plant species distributions across the Alps

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_F84355A8D90D.P001.pdf (2421.66 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F84355A8D90D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Tree cover at fine and coarse spatial grains interacts with shade tolerance to shape plant species distributions across the Alps
Périodique
Ecography
Auteur(s)
Nieto-Lugilde D., Lenoir J., Abdulhak S., Aeschimann D., Dullinger S., Gégout J.-C., Guisan A., Pauli H., Renaud J., Theurillat J.-P., Thuiller W., Van Es J., Vittoz P., Willner W., Wohlgemuth T., Zimmermann N.E., Svenning J.-C.
ISSN
1600-0587 (electronic)
ISSN-L
0906-7590
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Numéro
6
Pages
578-589
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The role of competition for light among plants has long been recognized at local scales, but its potential importance for plant species' distribution at larger spatial scales has largely been ignored. Tree cover acts as a modulator of local abiotic conditions, notably by reducing light availability below the canopy and thus the performance of species that are not adapted to low-light conditions. However, this local effect may propagate to coarser spatial grains.
Using 6,935 vegetation plots located across the European Alps, we fit Generalized Linear Models (GLM) for the distribution of 960 herbs and shrubs species to assess the effect of tree cover at both plot and landscape grain sizes (~ 10-m and 1-km, respectively). We ran four models with different combinations of variables (climate, soil and tree cover) for each species at both spatial grains. We used partial regressions to evaluate the independent effects of plot- and landscape-scale tree cover on plant communities. Finally, the effects on species' elevational range limits were assessed by simulating a removal experiment comparing the species' distribution under high and low tree cover.
Accounting for tree cover improved model performance, with shade-tolerant species increasing their probability of presence at high tree cover whereas shade-intolerant species showed the opposite pattern. The tree cover effect occurred consistently at both plot and landscape spatial grains, albeit strongest at the former. Importantly, tree cover at the two grain sizes had partially independent effects on plot-scale plant communities, suggesting that the effects may be transmitted to coarser grains through meta-community dynamics. At high tree cover, shade-intolerant species exhibited elevational range contractions, especially at their upper limit, whereas shade-tolerant species showed elevational range expansions at both limits. Our findings suggest that the range shifts for herb and shrub species may be modulated by tree cover dynamics.
Mots-clé
biotic interactions, biotic modifiers, facilitation, light competition, shade tolerance, species distribution models, plant-plant interactions
Web of science
Création de la notice
04/09/2014 23:21
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:51
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