Transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F83B9C61974B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
Périodique
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Auteur(s)
Benninger D.H., Lomarev M., Lopez G., Wassermann E.M., Li X., Considine E., Hallett M.
ISSN
1468-330X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-3050
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
81
Numéro
10
Pages
1105-1111
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish. PDF type: Research papier
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor deficits which eventually respond less to dopaminergic therapy and thus pose a therapeutic challenge. Deep brain stimulation has proven efficacy but carries risks and is not possible in all patients. Non-invasive brain stimulation has shown promising results and may provide a therapeutic alternative.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the treatment of PD.
DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, sham controlled study.
SETTING: Research institution.
METHODS: The efficacy of anodal tDCS applied to the motor and prefrontal cortices was investigated in eight sessions over 2.5 weeks. Assessment over a 3 month period included timed tests of gait (primary outcome measure) and bradykinesia in the upper extremities, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Serial Reaction Time Task, Beck Depression Inventory, Health Survey and self-assessment of mobility.
RESULTS: Twenty-five PD patients were investigated, 13 receiving tDCS and 12 sham stimulation. tDCS improved gait by some measures for a short time and improved bradykinesia in both the on and off states for longer than 3 months. Changes in UPDRS, reaction time, physical and mental well being, and self-assessed mobility did not differ between the tDCS and sham interventions.
CONCLUSION: tDCS of the motor and prefrontal cortices may have therapeutic potential in PD but better stimulation parameters need to be established to make the technique clinically viable. This study was publicly registered (clinicaltrials.org: NCT00082342).
Mots-clé
Aged, Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods, Female, Gait/physiology, Humans, Hypokinesia/therapy, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Cortex/physiology, Parkinson Disease/therapy, Prefrontal Cortex/physiology, Reaction Time/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/10/2012 10:41
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:51
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