Promotion of condom use in a high-risk setting in Nicaragua: a randomised controlled trial

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F7ABCA15724D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Promotion of condom use in a high-risk setting in Nicaragua: a randomised controlled trial
Périodique
The Lancet
Auteur(s)
Egger Matthias, Pauw Josefina, Lopatatzidis Athanasios, Medrano Danilo, Paccaud Fred, Davey Smith George
ISSN
0140-6736
ISSN-L
0140-6736
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2000
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
355
Numéro
9221
Pages
2101-2105
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: In Latin America, motels rent rooms for commercial and non-commercial sex. We investigated the impact of providing health-education material and condoms on condom use in Managua, Nicaragua. METHODS: In a randomised controlled trial, in 19 motels, we gave condoms on request, made them available in rooms, or gave condoms directly to couples, with and without the presence of health-education material in the rooms. In a factorial design we assessed condom use directly by searching the rooms after couples had left. FINDINGS: 11 motels were used mainly by sex workers and their clients and eight mainly for non-commercial sex. 6463 couples attended the motels in 24 days. On 3106 (48.0%) occasions, at least one used condom was retrieved. Condom use was more frequent for commercial sex than for non-commercial sex (60.5 vs 20.2%). The presence of health-education material lowered the frequency of condom use for commercial sex (odds ratio 0.89 [95% CI 0.84-0.94]) and had no effect on use for non-commercial sex (1.03 [0.97-1.08]). Condom use increased for commercial (1.31 [1.09-1.75]) and non-commercial sex (1.81 (1.14-2.81) if condoms were available in rooms. Directly handing condoms to couples was similarly effective for commercial sex but less effective for non-commercial sex (1.32 [1.03-1.61] vs 1.52 [1.01-2.38]). INTERPRETATION: In Latin America, motels are key locations for promoting the use of condoms. Making condoms available in rooms is the most effective strategy to increase condom use, whereas use of health-education material was ineffective. These findings have important implications for HIV-prevention policies. [Authors]
Mots-clé
Condoms , Disease Transmission, Horizontal , Health Education , HIV infections , Prostitution , Nicaragua
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/03/2008 11:21
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:50
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