Asymmetric assortative mating and queen polyandry are linked to a supergene controlling ant social organization.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F77092762254
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Asymmetric assortative mating and queen polyandry are linked to a supergene controlling ant social organization.
Périodique
Molecular ecology
Auteur(s)
Avril A., Purcell J., Brelsford A., Chapuisat M.
ISSN
1365-294X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-1083
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
28
Numéro
6
Pages
1428-1438
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Nonrecombining genomic variants underlie spectacular social polymorphisms, from bird mating systems to ant social organization. Because these "social supergenes" affect multiple phenotypic traits linked to survival and reproduction, explaining their persistence remains a substantial challenge. Here, we investigate how large nonrecombining genomic variants relate to colony social organization, mating system and dispersal in the Alpine silver ant, Formica selysi. The species has colonies headed by a single queen (monogynous) and colonies headed by multiple queens (polygynous). We confirmed that a supergene with alternate haplotypes-Sm and Sp-underlies this polymorphism in social structure: Females from mature monogynous colonies had the Sm/Sm genotype, while those from polygynous colonies were Sm/Sp and Sp/Sp. Queens heading monogynous colonies were exclusively mated with Sm males. In contrast, queens heading polygynous colonies were mated with Sp males and Sm males. Sm males, which are only produced by monogynous colonies, accounted for 22.9% of the matings with queens from mature polygynous colonies. This asymmetry between social forms in the degree of assortative mating generates unidirectional male-mediated gene flow from the monogynous to the polygynous social form. Biased gene flow was confirmed by a significantly higher number of private alleles in the polygynous social form. Moreover, heterozygous queens were three times as likely as homozygous queens to be multiply mated. This study reveals that the supergene variants jointly affect social organization and multiple components of the mating system that alter the transmission of the variants and thus influence the dynamics of the system.
Mots-clé
ants, mating system, polymorphism, social organization, supergene
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
06/08/2018 17:25
Dernière modification de la notice
10/05/2019 7:09
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