Capturing postoperative pain responses in critically ill infants aged 0 to 9 months.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F6AE84C06DC7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Capturing postoperative pain responses in critically ill infants aged 0 to 9 months.
Périodique
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Auteur(s)
Ramelet A.S., Abu-Saad H.H., Bulsara M.K., Rees N., McDonald S.
ISSN
1529-7535 (Print)
ISSN-L
1529-7535
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Volume
7
Numéro
1
Pages
19-26
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Evaluation Studies ; Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe physiologic and behavioral pain behaviors in postoperative critically ill infants. A secondary aim was to identify how these pain responses vary over time.
DESIGN: This observational study was conducted in the pediatric intensive care unit at two tertiary referral hospitals. Using ethological methods of observation, video recordings of postoperative infants were viewed to depict different situations of pain and no pain and were then coded using a reliable checklist.
PATIENTS: A total of 803 recorded segments were generated from recordings of five critically ill infants aged between 0 and 9 months who had undergone major surgery.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was an 82% agreement between the two coders. Multivariate analyses showed that physiologic responses differed only when adjusted for time. Significant decreases in systolic and diastolic arterial pressure (p < .001 and p = .036, respectively) were associated with postoperative pain exacerbated by painful procedures on day 2. On day 3, however, heart rate, arterial pressure (systolic, diastolic, and mean), and central venous pressure significantly increased (p < .05) in response to postoperative pain. Indicators included vertical stretch of the mouth, hand twitching, and jerky leg movements for postoperative pain and increase in respiratory distress, frown, eyes tightly closed, angular stretch of the mouth, silent or weak cry, jerky head movements, fist, pulling knees up, and spreading feet for postoperative pain exacerbated by painful stimuli.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the ability to capture different intensities of postoperative pain in critically ill infants beyond neonatal age. These pain indicators can be used for the development of a pain assessment tool for this group of infants.
Mots-clé
Female, Humans, Infant, Infant Behavior, Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Observation, Observer Variation, Pain Measurement/methods, Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis, Pain, Postoperative/physiopathology, Reproducibility of Results
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
06/02/2013 19:47
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:23
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