Efficiency and significance of multiple vocal signals in sibling competition

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F50C5F112218
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Efficiency and significance of multiple vocal signals in sibling competition
Périodique
Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Ruppli C.A., Dreiss A.N., Roulin A.
ISSN
0071-3260
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
40
Numéro
4
Pages
579-588
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Animals can compete for resources by displaying various acoustic signals that may differentially affect the outcome of competition. We propose the hypothesis that the most efficient signal to deter opponents should be the one that most honestly reveals motivation to compete. We tested this hypothesis in the barn owl (Tyto alba) in which nestlings produce more calls of longer duration than siblings to compete for priority access to the indivisible prey item their parents will deliver next. Because nestlings increase call rate to a larger extent than call duration when they become hungrier, call rate would signal more accurately hunger level. This leads us to propose three predictions. First, a high number of calls should be more efficient in deterring siblings to compete than long calls. Second, the rate at which an individual calls should be more sensitive to variation in the intensity of the sibling vocal competition than the duration of its calls. Third, call rate should influence competitors' vocalization for a longer period of time than call duration. To test these three predictions we performed playback experiments by broadcasting to singleton nestlings calls of varying durations and at different rates. According to the first prediction, singleton nestlings became less vocal to a larger extent when we broadcasted more calls compared to longer calls. In line with the second prediction, nestlings reduced vocalization rate to a larger extent than call duration when we broadcasted more or longer calls. Finally, call rate had a longer influence on opponent's vocal behavior than call duration. Young animals thus actively and differentially use multiple signaling components to compete with their siblings over parental resources.
Mots-clé
Begging, Call rate, Call duration, Multiple signaling, Sibling negotiation, Sibling competition, Communication
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/05/2013 20:15
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:21
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