An analysis of patients' understanding of 'routine' preoperative blood tests and HIV screening. Is no news really good news?

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_F2E58EF46555
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
An analysis of patients' understanding of 'routine' preoperative blood tests and HIV screening. Is no news really good news?
Périodique
HIV Medicine
Auteur(s)
Albrecht E., Frascarolo P., Meystre-Agustoni G., Farron A., Gilliard N., Darling K., Cavassini M.
ISSN
1468-1293 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1464-2662
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Numéro
7
Pages
439-443
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: Many patients may believe that HIV screening is included in routine preoperative work-ups. We examined what proportion of patients undergoing preoperative blood testing believed that they had been tested for HIV.
METHODS: All patients hospitalized for elective orthopaedic surgery between January and December 2007 were contacted and asked to participate in a 15-min computer-assisted telephone interview (n = 1330). The primary outcome was to determine which preoperative tests patients believed had been performed from a choice of glucose, clotting, HIV serology and cholesterol, and what percentage of patients interpreted the lack of result communication as a normal or negative test. The proportion of patients agreeable to HIV screening prior to future surgery was also determined.
RESULTS: A total of 991 patients (75%) completed the questionnaire. Three hundred and seventy-five of these 991 patients (38%) believed incorrectly that they had been tested for HIV preoperatively. Younger patients were significantly more likely to believe that an HIV test had been performed (mean age 46 vs. 50 years for those who did not believe that an HIV test had been performed; P < 0.0001). Of the patients who believed that a test had been performed but received no result, 96% interpreted lack of a result as a negative HIV test. Over 80% of patients surveyed stated that they would agree to routine HIV screening prior to future surgery. A higher acceptance rate was associated with younger age (mean age 47 years for those who would agree vs. 56 years for those who would not; P < 0.0001) and male sex ( P < 0.009).
CONCLUSIONS: Many patients believe that a preoperative blood test routinely screens for HIV. The incorrect assumption that a lack of result communication indicates a negative test may contribute to delays in HIV diagnoses.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/08/2012 7:18
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:20
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