Total and exogenous carbohydrate oxidation in obese prepubertal children.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_EF87A1AA0648
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Total and exogenous carbohydrate oxidation in obese prepubertal children.
Périodique
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Auteur(s)
Rueda-Maza C.M., Maffeis C., Zaffanello M., Schutz Y.
ISSN
0002-9165 (Print)
ISSN-L
0002-9165
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/1996
Volume
64
Numéro
6
Pages
844-849
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The aim was to explore whether the origin of carbohydrate oxidation (exogenous compared with endogenous carbohydrate) after consumption of a mixed meal was influenced by obesity in children. Ten obese prepubertal children 8 y of age (44.2 +/- 3.6 kg) were studied over 9.5 h and compared with eight normal-weight, matched control children (28.5 +/- 1.6 kg). They were fed a mixed meal containing naturally enriched [13C]carbohydrate (cane sugar and popcorn) providing 55% of the daily energy requirement as measured by 24-h resting metabolic rate. Total carbohydrate oxidation was calculated by indirect calorimetry (hood system) whereas exogenous carbohydrate oxidation was estimated from carbon dioxide production (VCO2), the isotopic enrichment of breath 13CO2, and the abundance of [13C]carbohydrate in the meal ingested. The time course of 13CO2 in breath-measured over 570 min-followed a similar pattern in both groups. Although total carbohydrate oxidation was not significantly different among the two groups, exogenous carbohydrate utilization was significantly greater (P < 0.03) and endogenous carbohydrate oxidation was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in obese compared with control children. In addition, the rate of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation expressed as a proportion of total carbohydrate oxidation was positively related to the body fat of the children (r = 0.68, P < 0.01). The study suggests that in the postprandial phase, a smaller proportion of carbohydrate oxidation is accounted for by glycogen breakdown in obese children. The sparing of endogenous glycogen may result from decreased glycogen turnover already present at an early age.
Mots-clé
Aging/metabolism, Aging/physiology, Anthropometry, Body Composition/physiology, Calorimetry, Indirect, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Carbon Isotopes, Child, Dietary Carbohydrates/metabolism, Eating/physiology, Glycogen/metabolism, Humans, Male, Obesity/metabolism, Obesity/physiopathology, Oxidation-Reduction, Skinfold Thickness
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
21/01/2008 14:09
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:34
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