« A world-famous lunatic: the "Seillière affair" (1887-1889) and the circulation of anti-alienists' views in the nineteenth century »

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_EF56142BF0E1
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Titre
« A world-famous lunatic: the "Seillière affair" (1887-1889) and the circulation of anti-alienists' views in the nineteenth century »
Titre du livre
Transnational Psychiatries. Social and Cultural Histories of Psychiatry in Comparative Perspective c. 1800-2000
Auteur(s)
Fauvel Aude
Editeur
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN
9781443822176
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Editeur scientifique
Ernst Waltraud, Mueller Thomas
Numéro de chapitre
8
Pages
200-228
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Following Foucault's analysis of "psychiatric power", the French history of psychiatry has considered the insane to be the great absence of history, being immured within the walls of psychiatric discourse as well as those, more concrete, of the asylum. In this chapter, the author discusses this classic a priori of the French historiography, as recent research reveals that in France-as elsewhere-lunatics actually managed to express themselves and to be heard outside of the medical walls, to a greater extent than hitherto thought. The "mad culture" thus diffused into the "normal one", patients‟ words and actions contributing to the shaping of modern images of madness. These discoveries not only shed new light on the French past. They also suggest that the role played by patients in the history of psychiatry should be studied in a more transnational perspective, as it appears that several lunatics were able to transcend boundaries and to trigger debates on a larger scene. Such was the case of Baron Raymond Seillière, whose various encounters with mind-doctors (including Jean-Martin Charcot) caused an international stir, forcing France and the United States to compare their views on the management of the insane. Seillière's psychiatric wanderings thus provide an interesting insight into patients‟ participation in the circulation of "anti-alienist" conceptions at the end of the 19th century, a time when many believed that what the insane had to say was as important as their physicians‟ jargon.
Mots-clé
history, psychiatry, France, USA, Raymond Seillère, Edmond Kelly, Benjamin Ball, Jean-Martin Charcot, 19th century
Création de la notice
20/10/2016 18:37
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:34
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