Prevalence of frailty in middle-aged and older community-dwelling Europeans living in 10 countries.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_EF1AD04B37DF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Prevalence of frailty in middle-aged and older community-dwelling Europeans living in 10 countries.
Périodique
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Auteur(s)
Santos-Eggimann Brigitte, Cuénoud Patrick, Spagnoli Jacques, Junod Julien
ISSN
1758-535X[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
64
Numéro
6
Pages
675-681
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Frailty is an indicator of health status in old age. Its frequency has been described mainly for North America; comparable data from other countries are lacking. Here we report on the prevalence of frailty in 10 European countries included in a population-based survey. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 18,227 randomly selected community-dwelling individuals 50 years of age and older, enrolled in the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) in 2004. Complete data for assessing a frailty phenotype (exhaustion, shrinking, weakness, slowness, and low physical activity) were available for 16,584 participants. Prevalences of frailty and prefrailty were estimated for individuals 50-64 years and 65 years of age and older from each country. The latter group was analyzed further after excluding disabled individuals. We estimated country effects in this subset using multivariate logistic regression models, controlling first for age, gender, and then demographics and education. RESULTS: The proportion of frailty (three to five criteria) or prefrailty (one to two criteria) was higher in southern than in northern Europe. International differences in the prevalences of frailty and prefrailty for 65 years and older group persisted after excluding the disabled. Demographic characteristics did not account for international differences; however, education was associated with frailty. Controlling for education, age and gender diminished the effects of residing in Italy and Spain. CONCLUSIONS: A higher prevalence of frailty in southern countries is consistent with previous findings of a north-south gradient for other health indicators in SHARE. Our data suggest that socioeconomic factors like education contribute to these differences in frailty and prefrailty.
Mots-clé
Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cross-Sectional Studies, Europe/epidemiology, Fatigue/epidemiology, Female, Frail Elderly/statistics & numerical data, Geriatric Assessment, Health Status, Health Surveys, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Weakness/epidemiology, Physical Fitness, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
27/06/2009 15:56
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:34
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