Androgenesis: where males hijack eggs to clone themselves.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_EEBDB7805D6A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Androgenesis: where males hijack eggs to clone themselves.
Périodique
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Auteur(s)
Schwander T., Oldroyd B.P.
ISSN
1471-2970 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-8436
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
371
Numéro
1706
Pages
20150534
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Androgenesis is a form of quasi-sexual reproduction in which a male is the sole source of the nuclear genetic material in the embryo. Two types of androgenesis occur in nature. Under the first type, females produce eggs without a nucleus and the embryo develops from the male gamete following fertilization. Evolution of this type of androgenesis is poorly understood as the parent responsible for androgenesis (the mother) gains no benefit from it. Ultimate factors driving the evolution of the second type of androgenesis are better understood. In this case, a zygote is formed between a male and a female gamete, but the female genome is eliminated. When rare, androgenesis with genome elimination is favoured because an androgenesis-determining allele has twice the reproductive success of an allele that determines sexual reproduction. Paradoxically, except in hermaphrodites, a successful androgenetic strain can drive such a male-biased sex ratio that the population goes extinct. This likely explains why androgenesis with genome elimination appears to be rarer than androgenesis via non-nucleate eggs, although both forms are either very rare or remain largely undetected in nature. Nonetheless, some highly invasive species including ants and freshwater clams are androgenetic, for reasons that are largely unexplained.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'.
Mots-clé
Cupressus dupreziana, Corbicula spp., Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, Paratrechina longicornis, Bacillus spp.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/06/2016 10:53
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 3:10
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