Payoff- and Sex-Biased Social Learning Interact in a Wild Primate Population.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Whiten & van de Waal BE&S accepted with figures.pdf (533.82 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_ED379B2DFAFF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Payoff- and Sex-Biased Social Learning Interact in a Wild Primate Population.
Périodique
Current biology
Auteur(s)
Bono AEJ, Whiten A., van Schaik C., Krützen M., Eichenberger F., Schnider A., van de Waal E.
ISSN
1879-0445 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0960-9822
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
10/09/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
28
Numéro
17
Pages
2800-2805.e4
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Social learning in animals is now well documented, but few studies have determined the contexts shaping when social learning is deployed. Theoretical studies predict copying of conspecifics gaining higher payoffs [1-4], a bias demonstrated in primates only in captivity [5]. In the wild, research has shown selective attention toward the philopatric sex, a group's stable core [6]. Here, we report the first rigorous experimental test of the existence of a payoff bias in wild primates and its interaction with the sex of the model. We created a payoff bias in which an immigrant alpha male in each of three groups of wild vervet monkeys received five times more food upon opening a foraging box than did the philopatric alpha female, whereas in two control groups, male and female models received the same amount of food. We tested whether this payoff asymmetry would override the previously documented selective learning from resident females. Group members were tested after having watched both models. When both models received the same amount of food, audience members copied the female model significantly more than the male model, confirming previous findings. However, when a marked payoff bias was introduced, male, but not female, vervet monkeys significantly more often copied the male model receiving a higher payoff. These results demonstrate behavioral flexibility in the dispersing sex in these primates and suggest that the philopatric sex can afford to be more conservative in their social learning. Our findings show that multiple social-learning biases can coexist and interact within the same species.
Mots-clé
Animals, Animals, Wild, Attention, Cercopithecus aethiops/physiology, Female, Male, Social Behavior, Social Learning/physiology, cultural transmission, field experiment, sex differences, social learning strategy, vervet monkeys
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/09/2018 14:09
Dernière modification de la notice
22/10/2019 5:11
Données d'usage