Pheomelanin-based coloration and the ability to cope with variation in food supply and parasitism.

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_EAB7DB3884DC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Pheomelanin-based coloration and the ability to cope with variation in food supply and parasitism.
Périodique
American Naturalist
Auteur(s)
Piault R., Gasparini J., Bize P., Jenni-Eiermann S., Roulin A.
ISSN
1537-5323 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0003-0147
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
174
Numéro
4
Pages
548-556
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Although gene by environment interactions may play a key role in the maintenance of genetic polymorphisms, little is known about the ecological factors involved in these interactions. We investigated whether food supply and parasites can mediate covariation between the degree of adult pheomelanin-based coloration, a heritable trait, and offspring body mass in the tawny owl (Strix aluco). We swapped clutches between nests to allocate genotypes randomly among environments. Three weeks after hatching, we challenged the immune system of 80 unrelated nestlings with either a phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or a lipopolysaccharide, surrogates of alternative parasites, and then fed them ad lib. or food-restricted them during the following 6 days in the laboratory. Whatever the immune challenge, nestlings fed ad lib. converted food more efficiently into body mass when their biological mother was dark pheomelanic. In contrast, food-restricted nestlings challenged with PHA lost less body mass when their biological mother was pale pheomelanic. Nestling tawny owls born from differently melanic mothers thus show differing reaction norms relative to food availability and parasitism. This suggests that dark and pale pheomelanic owls reflect alternative adaptations to food availability and parasites, factors known to vary in space and time.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Biological, Animals, Body Weight, Environment, Female, Food, Lipopolysaccharides, Male, Melanins/physiology, Phytohemagglutinins, Pigmentation, Strigiformes/parasitology, Strigiformes/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/05/2009 12:31
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:13
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