Monitoring butterfly abundance: beyond Pollard walks.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_E92214F1CE68.P001.pdf (396.74 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_E92214F1CE68
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Monitoring butterfly abundance: beyond Pollard walks.
Périodique
PLoS One
Auteur(s)
Pellet J., Bried J.T., Parietti D., Gander A., Heer P.O., Cherix D., Arlettaz R.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Numéro
7
Pages
e41396
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly reflect population sizes and trends. This study compares capture-mark-recapture (absolute abundance) and count-index (relative abundance) monitoring methods in three species (Maculinea nausithous and Iolana iolas: Lycaenidae; Minois dryas: Satyridae) in contrasted habitat types. We demonstrate that intraspecific variability in individual detectability under standard monitoring conditions is probably the rule rather than the exception, which questions the reliability of count-based indices to estimate and compare specific population abundance. Our results suggest that the accuracy of count-based methods depends heavily on the ecology and behavior of the target species, as well as on the type of habitat in which surveys take place. Monitoring programs designed to assess the abundance and trends in butterfly populations should incorporate a measure of detectability. We discuss the relative advantages and inconveniences of current monitoring methods and analytical approaches with respect to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability.
Mots-clé
Animals, Biodiversity, Biomass, Butterflies, Conservation of Natural Resources, Population Density, Population Dynamics, Population Surveillance, Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/10/2012 20:53
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 2:51
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