Pink for girls, red for boys, and blue for both genders: Colour preferences in children and adults

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Jonauskaite_et_al-2019-Sex_Roles_post-print.pdf (1941.37 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_E8DEDD12C349
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Pink for girls, red for boys, and blue for both genders: Colour preferences in children and adults
Périodique
Sex Roles
Auteur(s)
Jonauskaite Domicele, Dael Nele, Chèvre Laetitia, Althaus Betty, Tremea Alessandro, Charalambides Laetitia, Mohr Christine
ISSN
0360-0025
1573-2762
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
80
Numéro
9-10
Pages
630-642
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Colours carry social connotations like pink for girls and blue for boys. In a cross-sectional study, we investigated whether such early gender coding might be reflected in absolute colour preferences in children and adults of both genders. In two studies, participants selected their favourite (and least favourite, Study 2) colour from an unrestricted sample of colours. We tested 129 Swiss children (Study 1, 10–14 years-old, 68 boys) and 180 Swiss adults (Study 2, 17–48 years-old, 88 men). In children, we observed that girls chose pink/purple as their favourite hue more often than boys did, the most common favourite hue in girls and boys was blue, and boys chose red as their favourite more often than girls did. In adults, we observed that both genders almost never choose pink as their favourite, blue was a common favourite colour, and women were more likely to favour red than were men. In an additional study (n = 183 Swiss participants, 47 men), we tested whether liking of pink, blue, and red was related to emotion associations with these colours. Pink was associated with positive emotions to the same extent as blue and red. Women further associated more positive emotions with pink than did men. We conclude that some commonalities (blue) and gender differences (pink and red) exist in absolute colour preferences. These differences, however, cannot be fully accounted by emotional associations. We speculate about these gendered colour preferences in relation to gender stereotypes and status differences between men and women.
Mots-clé
Developmental and Educational Psychology, Social Psychology, Gender Studies
Création de la notice
27/08/2018 9:59
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:11
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