FM127: Systemic metal ion levels in patients with modular neck total hip arthroplasties: a prospective cohort study

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ID Serval
serval:BIB_DFF55014F81E
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Titre
FM127: Systemic metal ion levels in patients with modular neck total hip arthroplasties: a prospective cohort study
Titre de la conférence
74e Congrès annuel de Swiss Orthopaedics
Auteur(s)
Laurençon J., Gkagkalis G., Augsburger M., Hassani H., Becce F., Rüdiger HA
Adresse
Centre de Congrès Olma, Saint-Gall, June, 25-27th, 2014
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Langue
anglais
Résumé
There is increasing evidence that modular neck stems are prone to corrosion-related complications. Recent studies showed elevated metal ions levels and occasional pseudotumor formation in patients with such implants. The purpose of this study was to compare systemic metal-ion levels in patients after primary THA with modular neck stems to those of patients after non-modular implants. To our knowledge, this is the first cohort study including a control group, THA without CoCr heads and dry-assembled neck-stem connections.
Methods: 50 patients after THA at a minimum follow-up of 1 year have been selected for the study. Patients with multiple prosthesis or other implants have been deselected. All received a cementless SPS stem from Symbios (Ti6Al4V). 40 patients have the modular neck (CoCr) version and 10 a monobloc version. All bearings
were either ceramic-ceramic or ceramic-polyethylene to minimize other sources of CoCr ion release. In the modular group, the neck was chosen pre-operatively based on a 3D planning, allowing for a dry assembly of the stem and neck on the back table before implantation. A plasma system coupled to mass spectrometry was used for a complete elementary quantification in blood and serum separately. Clinical outcome was measured using the Oxford Hip Score.
Results : Complete data sets of 29 patients (24 in the modular neck-group (10male, mean age 63y, 35-84y) and 5 in the monobloc-group (3 male, 69 y, 51-83y) are available to date. Mean Co blood levels were .95 ug/L (.14-12.4) in the modular group vs .27 ug/L (.10-.73) in the monobloc group (p=.2). Respective values for Cr were significantly higher in the modular group (.99 g/L; range .75-1.21) compared to those in the monobloc group (.74 g/L ;.62-.86; p=.001). No significant difference was found when comparing serum levels. 5/24 patients had Co levels above 1 g/L (12/24 for Cr), which is by some considered as a relevant elevation. The maximum Co level was measured in an asymptomatic patient. The Oxford Hip Scores were similar in both groups.
Conclusion: Cr levels were significantly elevated in the modular neck group compared to those in the monobloc group. 1/24 patients with a modular prosthesis exhibited Co levels, which are beyond the threshold accepted even for metal-on-metal bearing couples. These results have contributed to our decision to abandon the use of modular neck stems. Routine follow-up including annual measurements of systemic CoCr concentrations should be considered.
Création de la notice
14/07/2014 10:42
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:04
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