Functional MRI follow-up study of language processes in healthy subjects and during recovery in a case of aphasia.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_DD71747ECAC6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Functional MRI follow-up study of language processes in healthy subjects and during recovery in a case of aphasia.
Périodique
Stroke
Auteur(s)
Fernandez B., Cardebat D., Demonet J.F., Joseph P.A., Mazaux J.M., Barat M., Allard M.
ISSN
1524-4628 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0039-2499
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
35
Numéro
9
Pages
2171-2176
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Case Reports ; Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to develop a functional MRI (fMRI) paradigm robust and reproducible enough in healthy subjects to be adapted for a follow-up study aiming at evaluating the anatomical substratum of recovery in poststroke aphasia.
METHODS: Ten right-handed subjects were studied longitudinally using fMRI (7 of them being scanned twice) and compared with a patient with conduction aphasia during the first year of stroke recovery.
RESULTS: Controls exhibited reproducible activation patterns between subjects and between sessions during language tasks. In contrast, the patient exhibited dynamic changes in brain activation pattern, particularly in the phonological task, during the 2 fMRI sessions. At 1 month after stroke, language homotopic right areas were recruited, whereas large perilesional left involvement occurred later (12 months).
CONCLUSIONS: We first demonstrate intersubject robustness and intrasubject reproducibility of our paradigm in 10 healthy subjects and thus its validity in a patient follow-up study over a stroke recovery time course. Indeed, results suggest a spatiotemporal poststroke brain reorganization involving both hemispheres during the recovery course, with an early implication of a new contralateral functional neural network and a later implication of an ipsilateral one.
Mots-clé
Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Aphasia, Conduction/physiopathology, Aphasia, Conduction/rehabilitation, Aphasia, Wernicke/physiopathology, Aphasia, Wernicke/rehabilitation, Brain Mapping, Cerebellum/physiopathology, Cerebral Cortex/physiopathology, Convalescence, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Language, Language Tests, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuronal Plasticity, Photic Stimulation, Prefrontal Cortex/physiology, Reproducibility of Results, Semantics, Temporal Lobe/physiology, Temporal Lobe/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:02
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