Impact of MBL2 gene polymorphisms on the risk of infection in solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_DCCBD6B537B5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Impact of MBL2 gene polymorphisms on the risk of infection in solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Périodique
American journal of transplantation
Auteur(s)
Fernández-Ruiz M., Giménez E., Lora D., Aguado J.M., Pascual M., Manuel O.
ISSN
1600-6143 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1600-6135
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Numéro
4
Pages
1072-1085
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a soluble pattern recognition molecule involved in complement activation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 gene have been associated with susceptibility to infection, although data in solid organ transplant recipients remains inconclusive. This meta-analysis was primarily aimed at investigating the association between posttransplant bacterial and fungal infection and variant alleles of MBL2 gene SNPs in the promoter/5' untranslated region and exon 1. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and/or disease were considered secondary outcomes. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles up to August 2018. Eleven studies (comprising 1858 patients) were included, with liver transplant (LT) recipients accounting for 80.4% of the pooled population. As compared to high-MBL expression haplotypes (YA/YA, YA/XA), any MBL-deficient haplotype was associated with an increased risk of posttransplant bacterial and fungal infections (risk ratio [RR]: 1.30; P = .04). Low/null-MBL expression haplotypes (XA/O, O/O) also increased the risk of primary outcome (RR: 1.51; P = .008) and CMV events (RR: 1.50; P = .006). No effect was observed for individual promoter SNPs. In conclusion, MBL-deficient haplotypes are associated with a significant, albeit moderate, increase in the risk of posttransplant infection, with this association being mainly restricted to LT recipients.
Mots-clé
clinical research/practice, complication: infectious, genetics, immune deficiency, infection and infectious agents, infectious disease, meta-analysis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
07/11/2018 12:12
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:01
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