How Would Pyrrho Have Been Socially Valued ? Social Desirability and Social Utility of Conflict Regulation

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_DCCAFAB251DF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
How Would Pyrrho Have Been Socially Valued ? Social Desirability and Social Utility of Conflict Regulation
Périodique
International Review of Social Psychology
Auteur(s)
Nicolas Sommet, Alain Quiamzade, Fabrizio Butrera
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
07/01/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
30
Numéro
1
Pages
141–148
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Mugny and his colleagues have shown that conflict is sometimes detrimental for learning, but other times beneficial, depending on how it is regulated. Yet, it is assumed that laypeople perceive conflict as uniformly negative. We argue that the valence of these lay perceptions depends on the mode of conflict regulation. Epistemic and relational protective conflict regulation behaviors (integrative and submissive response, respectively) can be described as more focused on the other than relational competitive conflict regulation (self-confirmatory response); thus, they should be perceived as more socially desirable. Moreover, epistemic and competitive regulations can be described as more focused on the self than protective regulation; thus, they should be perceived as more socially useful. First-year psychology students (N = 119) participants evaluated three bogus respondents allegedly regulating conflict in an epistemic, competitive, or protective manner. Results supported both hypotheses, suggesting that conflict is not to be avoided per se and can be positively valued as a function of its regulation.
Mots-clé
Socio-cognitive conflict, Conflict regulation, Social desirability, Social utility, Judge paradigm
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/07/2017 15:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:01
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