Neuroendocrine deregulation of food intake, adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal system in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_DC028FA49ABD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Neuroendocrine deregulation of food intake, adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal system in obesity and metabolic syndrome.
Périodique
Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases
Auteur(s)
Garruti G., Cotecchia S., Giampetruzzi F., Giorgino F., Giorgino R.
ISSN
1841-8724 (Print)
ISSN-L
1841-8724
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Numéro
2
Pages
193-198
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Obesity is an excess of fat mass. Fat mass is an energy depot but also an endocrine organ. A deregulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might produce obesity. Stress exaggerates diet-induced obesity. After stress, SNS fibers release neuropeptide Y (NPY) which directly increases visceral fat mass producing a metabolic syndrome (MbS)-like phenotype. Adrenergic receptors are the main regulators of lipolysis. In severe obesity, we demonstrated that the adrenergic receptor subtypes are differentially expressed in different fat depots. Liver and visceral fat share a common sympathetic pathway, which might explain the low-grade inflammation which simultaneously occurs in liver and fat of the obese with MbS. The neuroendocrine melanocortinergic system and gastric ghrelin are also greatly deregulated in obesity. A specific mutation in the type 4 melanocortin receptor induces early obesity onset, hyperphagia and insulin-resistance. Nonetheless, it was recently discovered that a mutation in the prohormone convertase 1/3 simultaneously produces severe gastrointestinal dysfunctions and obesity.
Mots-clé
Adipose Tissue/metabolism, Eating/physiology, Humans, Metabolic Syndrome X/metabolism, Neurosecretory Systems/metabolism, Obesity/metabolism, Proprotein Convertase 1/metabolism, Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/metabolism, Receptors, Adrenergic/metabolism, Sympathetic Nervous System/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/10/2009 12:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:00
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