Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_DBCF8227BA13
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.
Périodique
Neurology
Auteur(s)
Roux F.E., Lubrano V., Lauwers-Cances V., Giussani C., Démonet J.F.
ISSN
1526-632X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-3878
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Numéro
3
Pages
210-217
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions.
METHODS: Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks.
RESULTS: Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (<1 cm(2)). Over 259 language sites detected, 43 (17%) were exclusively involved in Arabic number reading (no sentence or word number reading interference detected in these sites). Specific Arabic number reading interferences were mainly found in three regions: the Broca area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p < 0.0001), and the temporal-basal area (Brodmann area 37; p < 0.05). Diverse types of interferences were observed (reading arrest, phonemic or semantic paraphasia). Error patterns were fairly similar across temporal, parietal, and frontal stimulation sites, except for phonemic paraphasias, which were found only in supramarginal gyrus.
CONCLUSION: Our findings strongly support the fact that the acquisition through education of specific symbolic entities, such as Arabic numbers, could result in the segregation and the specialization of anatomically distinct brain areas.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex/anatomy & histology, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Dominance, Cerebral/physiology, Electric Stimulation, Electroencephalography, Female, Frontal Lobe/anatomy & histology, Frontal Lobe/physiology, Humans, Male, Mathematics, Middle Aged, Nerve Net/physiology, Neuropsychological Tests, Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology, Photic Stimulation, Prospective Studies, Reading, Symbolism, Temporal Lobe/anatomy & histology, Temporal Lobe/physiology, Visual Cortex/anatomy & histology, Visual Cortex/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 17:00
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