Parental investment and its sensitivity to corticosterone is linked to melanin-based coloration in barn owls.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D9998E37C0E6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Parental investment and its sensitivity to corticosterone is linked to melanin-based coloration in barn owls.
Périodique
Hormones and Behavior
Auteur(s)
Almasi B., Roulin A., Jenni-Eiermann S., Jenni L.
ISSN
1095-6867[electronic], 0018-506X[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
54
Numéro
1
Pages
217-223
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Behavioral and physiological responses to unpredictable changes in environmental conditions are, in part, mediated by glucocorticoids (corticosterone in birds). In polymorphic species, individuals of the same sex and age display different heritable melanin-based color morphs, associated with physiological and reproductive parameters and possibly alternative strategies to cope with variation in environmental conditions. We examined whether the role of corticosterone in resolving the trade-off between self-maintenance and reproductive activities covaries with the size of melanin-based spots displayed on the ventral body side of male barn owls. Administration of corticosterone to simulate physiological stress in males revealed pronounced changes in their food-provisioning rates to nestlings compared to control males. Corticosterone-treated males with small eumelanic spots reduced nestling provisioning rates as compared to controls, and also to a greater degree than did corticosterone-treated males with large spots. Large-spotted males generally exhibited lower parental provisioning and appear insensitive to exogenous corticosterone suggesting that the size of the black spots on the breast feathers predicts the ability to cope with stressful situations. The reduced provisioning rate of corticosterone-treated males caused a temporary reduction in nestling growth rates but, did not affect fledgling success. This suggests that moderately elevated corticosterone levels are not inhibitory to current reproduction but rather trigger behavioral responses to maximize lifetime reproductive success.
Mots-clé
Animals, Animals, Newborn, Behavior, Animal/drug effects, Behavior, Animal/physiology, Color, Corticosterone/pharmacology, Corticosterone/physiology, Feeding Behavior/drug effects, Female, Male, Melanins/metabolism, Nesting Behavior/drug effects, Nesting Behavior/physiology, Pigmentation/drug effects, Pigmentation/physiology, Strigiformes/physiology, Survival
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
15/03/2008 18:31
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 21:53
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