Iterative Reconstructions in Reduced-Dose CT: Which Type Ensures Diagnostic Image Quality in Young Oncology Patients?

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 28365232.pdf (1439.56 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D9286BF48739
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Iterative Reconstructions in Reduced-Dose CT: Which Type Ensures Diagnostic Image Quality in Young Oncology Patients?
Périodique
Academic radiology
Auteur(s)
Pauchard B., Higashigaito K., Lamri-Senouci A., Knebel J.F., Berthold D., Verdun F.R., Alkadhi H., Schmidt S.
ISSN
1878-4046 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1076-6332
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Numéro
9
Pages
1114-1124
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To compare adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms for reduced-dose computed tomography (CT).
Forty-four young oncology patients (mean age 30 ± 9 years) were included. After routine thoraco-abdominal CT (dose 100%, average CTDI javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@e7f585f 9.1 ± 2.4 mGy, range 4.4-16.9 mGy), follow-up CT was acquired at 50% (average CTDI javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@2e35610f 4.5 ± 1.2 mGy, range 2.2-8.4 mGy) in 29 patients additionally at 20% dose (average CTDI javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@37ad3473 1.9 ± 0.5 mGy, range 0.9-3.4 mGy). Each reduced-dose CT was reconstructed using both ASIR and MBIR. Four radiologists (two juniors and two seniors) blinded to dose and technique read each set of CT images regarding objective and subjective image qualities (high- or low-contrast structures), subjective noise or pixilated appearance, diagnostic confidence, and lesion detection.
At all dose levels, objective image noise was significantly lower with MBIR than with ASIR (P < 0.001). The subjective image quality for low-contrast structures was significantly higher with MBIR than with ASIR (P < 0.001). Reduced-dose abdominal CT images of patients with higher body mass index (BMI) were read with significantly higher diagnostic confidence than images of slimmer patients (P < 0.001) and had higher subjective image quality, regardless of technique. Although MBIR images appeared significantly more pixilated than ASIR images, they were read with higher diagnostic confidence, especially by juniors (P < 0.001).
Reduced-dose CT during the follow-up of young oncology patients should be reconstructed with MBIR to ensure diagnostic quality. Elevated body mass index does not hamper the quality of reduced-dose CT.

Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Algorithms, Body Mass Index, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods, Male, Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging, Radiation Dosage, Radiation Exposure, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods, Signal-To-Noise Ratio, Single-Blind Method, Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods, Young Adult, Computed tomography (MDCT), computer-assisted, image processing, medical oncology, radiation exposure, radiographic image enhancement
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/04/2017 18:52
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 1:59
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