Sleep Bruxism in Respiratory Medicine Practice.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D608662E5686
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sleep Bruxism in Respiratory Medicine Practice.
Périodique
Chest
Auteur(s)
Mayer P., Heinzer R., Lavigne G.
ISSN
1931-3543 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0012-3692
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
149
Numéro
1
Pages
262-271
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Sleep bruxism (SB) consists of involuntary episodic and repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by occasional tooth grinding or jaw clenching during sleep. Prevalence decreases from 20% to 14% in childhood to 8% to 3% in adulthood. Although the causes and mechanisms of idiopathic primary SB are unknown, putative candidates include psychologic risk factors (eg, anxiety, stress due to life events, hypervigilance) and sleep physiologic reactivity (eg, sleep arousals with autonomic activity, breathing events). Although certain neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, noradrenalin, histamine) have been proposed to play an indirect role in SB, their exact contribution to rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) (the electromyography marker of SB) genesis remains undetermined. No specific gene is associated with SB; familial environmental influence plays a significant role. To date, no single explanation can account for the SB mechanism. Secondary SB with sleep comorbidities that should be clinically assessed are insomnia, periodic limb movements during sleep, sleep-disordered breathing (eg, apnea-hypopnea), gastroesophageal reflux disease, and neurologic disorders (eg, sleep epilepsy, rapid eye movement behavior disorder). SB is currently quantified by scoring RMMA recordings in parallel with brain, respiratory, and heart activity recordings in a sleep laboratory or home setting. RMMA confirmation with audio-video recordings is recommended for better diagnostic accuracy in the presence of neurologic conditions. Management strategies (diagnostic tests, treatment) should be tailored to the patient's phenotype and comorbidities. In the presence of sleep-disordered breathing, a mandibular advancement appliance or CPAP treatment is preferred over single occlusal splint therapy on the upper jaw.
Mots-clé
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, Humans, Mandibular Advancement, Occlusal Splints, Polysomnography, Sleep Apnea Syndromes/complications, Sleep Apnea Syndromes/diagnosis, Sleep Bruxism/complications, Sleep Bruxism/diagnosis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
09/03/2016 11:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:55
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