Welfare regimes and change in the employment structure: Britain, Denmark and Germany since 1990

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_D3BAF4C6B9DD.P001.pdf (576.32 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_D3BAF4C6B9DD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Welfare regimes and change in the employment structure: Britain, Denmark and Germany since 1990
Périodique
Journal of European Social Policy
Auteur(s)
Oesch D.
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
25
Numéro
1
Pages
94-110
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Welfare states are often reduced to their role as providers of social protection and redistribution. In 1990, Esping-Andersen argued that they also affect employment creation and the class structure. We analyse the stratification outcomes for three welfare regimes - Britain, Germany and Denmark - over the 1990s and 2000s. Based on individual-level surveys, we observe a disproportionate increase among professionals and managers, and a decline among production workers and clerks. The result is clear-cut occupational upgrading in Denmark and Germany. In Britain, high and low-end service jobs expanded, resulting in a polarized version of upgrading. Growth in low-end service jobs - and thus polarization - is no precondition for full employment. Both Britain and Denmark halved their low-educated unemployment rate between 1995 and 2008. Yet low-end service jobs expanded only in Britain, not in Denmark. The cause is the evolution of labour supply: rising educational attainment means that fewer low-educated workers look for low-skilled jobs.
Mots-clé
Esping-Andersen, polarization, social class, unemployment, welfare state
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
02/12/2014 9:28
Dernière modification de la notice
29/08/2019 15:16
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