Partner support during the prenatal testing period after assisted conception.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D1505FB2E9E4
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Partner support during the prenatal testing period after assisted conception.
Périodique
Women and birth
Auteur(s)
Darwiche J., Milek A., Antonietti J.P., Vial Y.
ISSN
1878-1799 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1871-5192
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Numéro
2
Pages
e264-e271
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Pregnancy after infertility is a challenging experience. The first-trimester screening test may add stress. Partner support reduces psychological distress in pregnant women after spontaneous conception. No data are available for women who conceive via assisted reproductive technology.
To assess whether there was a difference between couples who underwent assisted reproductive technology and couples who conceived spontaneously in the support they felt they provided to their partner and whether their perception of support received from their partner reduced their distress.
This longitudinal prospective study included 52 women (spontaneous conception) and 53 women (assisted reproductive technology), as well as their partners. Participants completed the state scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Edinburgh Depression Scale, and two partner-support subscales of the Dyadic Coping Inventory: before prenatal testing (gestational age 12 weeks), immediately after receiving the results (gestational age of approximately 14 weeks), and once all the prenatal screenings had been completed (gestational age 22 weeks).
Women who underwent assisted reproductive technology felt less able to help their partner cope with stress and felt their partner was less able to help them cope with stress than women with spontaneous pregnancy. This difference was not observed in men. Higher perceived partner support lowered the anxiety and depression of couples who conceived spontaneously, but did not benefit couples who followed fertility treatment.
These results add to our knowledge of the emotional state of women and their partners during pregnancy after infertility. This knowledge may allow prenatal care providers to offer specialized counselling to women and their partners in the transition from infertility to parenthood.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Anxiety/epidemiology, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Infertility/psychology, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Pregnancy, Prenatal Diagnosis, Prospective Studies, Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology, Sexual Partners, Social Support, Anxiety, Assisted reproductive technology, Depression, Partner support, Prenatal testing
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/08/2018 14:04
Dernière modification de la notice
01/07/2019 6:11
Données d'usage