Slow-wave activity in sleep apnea patients before and after continuous positive airway pressure treatment: contribution to daytime sleepiness

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_D00767226DE9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Slow-wave activity in sleep apnea patients before and after continuous positive airway pressure treatment: contribution to daytime sleepiness
Périodique
Chest
Auteur(s)
Heinzer  R., Gaudreau  H., Decary  A., Sforza  E., Petit  D., Morisson  F., Montplaisir  J.
ISSN
0012-3692 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2001
Volume
119
Numéro
6
Pages
1807-13
Notes
Clinical Trial
Journal Article --- Old month value: Jun
Résumé
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To estimate the course of slow-wave activity (SWA), its amount during the night, and its correlation with daytime sleepiness in sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) patients. This study also verified whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment also restores a normal pattern of SWA in severe SAS patients. PARTICIPANTS: Ten patients with a diagnosis of severe SAS who showed a good clinical response to CPAP after approximately 9 months of treatment were included in this study. These patients were matched for sex and age with 10 control subjects. DESIGN: All subjects underwent 1 night of polysomnography (PSG), followed by the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) the next day. For the SAS patients only, the same procedure was repeated after 9 +/- 0.7 months of CPAP treatment. In addition to traditional scoring of sleep stages, apneas, hypopneas, and microarousals, the SWA, defined as the power in the 0.75- to 4.5-Hz frequency band, was evaluated. RESULTS: A positive correlation between SWA of the first cycle and the MSLT (r = 0.56; p = 0.045) was found before treatment. Moreover, SAS patients significantly increased their mean SWA after CPAP treatment in the first (p = 0.024) and second (p = 0.002) sleep cycles and restored a more physiologic decay of SWA across the night. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that daytime sleepiness in SAS patients may be the result of a lack of SWA during the first part of the night, and show that CPAP restores a more physiologic pattern of SWA across the night.
Mots-clé
Adult Humans Male Middle Aged Polysomnography *Positive-Pressure Respiration Sleep/*physiology Sleep Apnea Syndromes/*physiopathology/*therapy Sleep Stages/*physiology Time Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 10:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:50
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