The Importance of REST for Development and Function of Beta Cells.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: fcell-05-00012.pdf (1865.31 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_CDF10D63F725
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The Importance of REST for Development and Function of Beta Cells.
Périodique
Frontiers in cell and developmental biology
Auteur(s)
Martin D., Grapin-Botton A.
ISSN-L
2296-634X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Pages
12
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Beta cells are defined by the genes they express, many of which are specific to this cell type, and ensure a specific set of functions. Beta cells are also defined by a set of genes they should not express (in order to function properly), and these genes have been called forbidden genes. Among these, the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is expressed in most cells of the body, excluding most populations of neurons, as well as pancreatic beta and alpha cells. In the cell types where it is expressed, REST represses the expression of hundreds of genes that are crucial for both neuronal and pancreatic endocrine function, through the recruitment of multiple transcriptional and epigenetic co-regulators. REST targets include genes encoding transcription factors, proteins involved in exocytosis, synaptic transmission or ion channeling, and non-coding RNAs. REST is expressed in the progenitors of both neurons and beta cells during development, but it is down-regulated as the cells differentiate. Although REST mutations and deregulation have yet to be connected to diabetes in humans, REST activation during both development and in adult beta cells leads to diabetes in mice.

Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
21/03/2017 19:22
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:48
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