Oscillating Positive Airway Pressure Versus CPAP for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_CDDEEBA81F1B.P001.pdf (1216.07 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_CDDEEBA81F1B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Oscillating Positive Airway Pressure Versus CPAP for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Périodique
Frontiers In Medicine
Auteur(s)
Haba-Rubio J., Petitpierre N.J., Cornette F., Tobback N., Vat S., Giallourou T., Al-Jumaily A., Heinzer R.
ISSN
2296-858X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2296-858X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2
Pages
29
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Medicine ; research-article Identifiant PubMed Central: PMC4426761
Résumé
Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), it is not always well tolerated by the patients. Previous physiological studies showed that pressure oscillations applied to the pharynx could activate upper airway muscles, but it is not clear whether these pressure oscillations could be tolerated during sleep in OSA patients. The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance of oscillating positive airway pressure (O-PAP) (a CPAP device delivering high-frequency pressure oscillations to the upper airway) compared to CPAP. Fourteen OSA patients currently on CPAP [age 59.9 ± 10.1 years old, BMI 34.8 ± 7.2 kg/m(2), initial apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 58.7 ± 25.2 events/h] used O-PAP or CPAP on two consecutive nights under polysomnography, in a single-blind randomized crossover design to assess sleep quality. A subtherapeutic pressure (70% of the optimal titrated pressure) was applied in both conditions and the residual AHI with each technique was also compared. There was no difference in measured or perceived sleep quality between the two treatment modalities (sleep efficiency 90.0% versus 88.1%, p = 0.54). Despite the small sample, we also found a trend toward a decrease in residual respiratory events with O-PAP compared to CPAP (median AHI 14.3 versus 20.5/h, p = 0.194). The good tolerance of O-PAP and the positive trend toward a reduction in residual AHI should stimulate further research on the effects of O-PAP in OSA patients.
Mots-clé
pharynx, vibration, arousal, obstructive sleep apnea, continuous positive airway pressure
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/07/2016 9:19
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:48
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