Effect of hypnotic suggestion on knee extensor neuromuscular properties in resting and fatigued states

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: journal.pone.0195437.pdf (5579.66 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_CC34C6EBAE35
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effect of hypnotic suggestion on knee extensor neuromuscular properties in resting and fatigued states
Périodique
PloS one
Auteur(s)
Dittrich N., Agostino D., Antonini Philippe R., Guglielmo LGA, Place N.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Online)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Numéro
4
Pages
NA
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The aim of this study was to investigate whether hypnotic suggestions can alter knee extensor neuromuscular function at rest and during exercise.
Thirteen healthy volunteers (8 men and 5 women, 27 ± 3 years old) took part in this counterbalanced, crossover study including two experimental (hypnosis and control) sessions. Knee extensor neuromuscular function was tested before and after hypnosis suggestion by using a combination of voluntary contraction, transcutaneous femoral nerve electrical stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A fatiguing exercise (sustained submaximal contraction at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force) was also performed to evaluate the potential influence of hypnosis on the extent and origin of neuromuscular adjustments.
Hypnosis did not (p>0.05) alter MVC force or knee extensor neural properties. Corticospinal excitability, assessed with the amplitude of knee extensor motor evoked potentials, was also unchanged (p>0.05), as was the level of intracortical inhibition assessed with paired pulse TMS (short-interval intracortical inhibition, SICI). Time to task failure (~300 s) was not different (p>0.05) between the two sessions; accordingly, hypnosis did not influence neuromuscular adjustments measured during exercise and at task failure (p>0.05).
Hypnotic suggestions did not alter neuromuscular properties of the knee extensor muscles under resting condition or during/after exercise, suggesting that hypnosis-induced improvement in exercise performance and enhanced corticospinal excitability might be limited to highly susceptible participants.
Mots-clé
Adult, Cross-Over Studies, Evoked Potentials, Motor, Exercise/physiology, Fatigue/physiopathology, Fatigue/therapy, Female, Femoral Nerve/physiology, Humans, Knee, Knee Joint, Male, Motor Cortex/physiology, Muscle Contraction/physiology, Muscle Fatigue/physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Pyramidal Tracts/physiology, Rest, Suggestion, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
26/04/2018 18:23
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 1:20
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