Recombination in Glomus intraradices, a supposed ancient asexual arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_CB2458759F7C.P001.pdf (320.82 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_CB2458759F7C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Recombination in Glomus intraradices, a supposed ancient asexual arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus
Périodique
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Croll D., Sanders I. R.
ISSN
1471-2148
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Numéro
13
Pages
1-11
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Background: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are important symbionts of most plant species, promoting plant diversity and productivity. This symbiosis is thought to have contributed to the early colonisation of land by plants. Morphological stasis over 400 million years and the lack of an observed sexual stage in any member of the phylum Glomeromycota led to the controversial suggestion of AMF being ancients asexuals. Evidence for recombination in AMF is contradictory.
Results: We addressed the question of recombination in the AMF Glomus intraradices by
sequencing 11 polymorphic nuclear loci in 40 morphologically identical isolates from one field. Phylogenetic relationships among genotypes showed a reticulate network pattern providing a rationale to test for recombination. Five statistical tests predicted multiple recombinant regions in the genome of a core set of isolates. In contrast, five clonal lineages had fixed a large number of differences.
Conclusion: Our data show that AMF from one field have undergone recombination but that clonal lineages coexist. This finding has important consequences for understanding AMF evolution, co-evolution of AMF and plants and highlights the potential for commercially introduced AMF inoculum recombining with existing local populations. Finally, our results reconcile seemingly contradictory studies on whether AMF are clonal or form recombining populations.
Mots-clé
DNA, Fungal/genetics, Evolution, Molecular, Genome, Fungal, Genotype, Glomeromycota/*genetics, Mycorrhizae/genetics, Phylogeny, Polymorphism, Genetic, Recombination, Genetic
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/01/2009 14:31
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 1:17
Données d'usage