Particulate matter contamination of intravenous antibiotics aggravates loss of functional capillary density in postischemic striated muscle.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_CA7F6F0DEE6F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Particulate matter contamination of intravenous antibiotics aggravates loss of functional capillary density in postischemic striated muscle.
Périodique
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Auteur(s)
Lehr H.A., Brunner J., Rangoonwala R., Kirkpatrick C.J.
ISSN
1073-449X (Print)
ISSN-L
1073-449X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2002
Volume
165
Numéro
4
Pages
514-520
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Evaluation Studies ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Through the increased use of less expensive and counterfeit medicines, the contamination of parenteral fluids and drugs by particulate matter poses an increasing health hazard worldwide. However, the mechanism of action of such contamination has never been conclusively demonstrated. We have systemically injected the particles contained in three different 1-g preparations of the antibiotic cefotaxime into hamsters and visualized the functional capillary density in striated skin muscle, using intravital fluorescence microscopy. Injection of particles from either of the three preparations did not affect capillary perfusion in normal muscle (n = 3 hamsters, each). However, injection of particles from two generic drug preparations, but not the original preparation or the saline control, significantly reduced capillary perfusion in muscle tissue that had previously been exposed to 4 h of pressure-induced ischemia and 2 h of reperfusion (n = 9 hamsters per group). Histological sections demonstrated birefringent particles mechanically obliterating the microcirculation of the striated muscle. The loss of capillary perfusion due to particle injection or injection of standardized microspheres was dependent on the extent of ischemia/reperfusion-induced muscle injury, with more capillaries lost in the more severely compromised muscle areas. These findings suggest that particle contaminants may not pose a major threat in intact tissue, but may severely compromise tissue perfusion in patients with prior microvascular compromise of vital organs (i.e., after trauma, major surgery, or sepsis) and thus predispose to complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or multiple organ failure.
Mots-clé
Animals, Capillaries/pathology, Cefotaxime/administration & dosage, Cephalosporins/administration & dosage, Cricetinae, Drug Contamination, Humans, Injections, Intravenous/adverse effects, Microcirculation, Microspheres, Muscle, Skeletal/blood supply, Muscle, Skeletal/pathology, Particle Size, Reperfusion Injury/etiology, Single-Blind Method
Pubmed
Création de la notice
26/11/2011 14:47
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:45
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