Measuring the diurnal pattern of leaf hyponasty and growth in Arabidopsis - a novel phenotyping approach using laser scanning

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_C9AB28BD0B7C.P001.pdf (1352.27 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_C9AB28BD0B7C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Measuring the diurnal pattern of leaf hyponasty and growth in Arabidopsis - a novel phenotyping approach using laser scanning
Périodique
Functional Plant Biology
Auteur(s)
Dornbusch T., Lorrain S., Kuznetsov D., Fortier A., Liechti R., Xenarios I., Fankhauser C.
ISSN
1445-4408 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Volume
39
Numéro
10-11
Pages
860-869
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Plants forming a rosette during their juvenile growth phase, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., are able to adjust the size, position and orientation of their leaves. These growth responses are under the control of the plants circadian clock and follow a characteristic diurnal rhythm. For instance, increased leaf elongation and hyponasty - defined here as the increase in leaf elevation angle - can be observed when plants are shaded. Shading can either be caused by a decrease in the fluence rate of photosynthetically active radiation (direct shade) or a decrease in the fluence rate of red compared with far-red radiation (neighbour detection). In this paper we report on a phenotyping approach based on laser scanning to measure the diurnal pattern of leaf hyponasty and increase in rosette size. In short days, leaves showed constitutively increased leaf elevation angles compared with long days, but the overall diurnal pattern and the magnitude of up and downward leaf movement was independent of daylength. Shade treatment led to elevated leaf angles during the first day of application, but did not affect the magnitude of up and downward leaf movement in the following day. Using our phenotyping device, individual plants can be non-invasively monitored during several days under different light conditions. Hence, it represents a proper tool to phenotype light- and circadian clock-mediated growth responses in order to better understand the underlying regulatory genetic network.
Mots-clé
Arabidopsis, circadian clock, diurnal, hyponasty, image processing, laser scanning, leaf elongation, petiole angle, phenotyping
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/12/2012 16:27
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:44
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