An outbreak of Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii dermatophytosis at a veterinary school associated with an infected horse.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C7951AC409FE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Titre
An outbreak of Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii dermatophytosis at a veterinary school associated with an infected horse.
Périodique
Mycoses
Auteur(s)
Chollet A., Wespi B., Roosje P., Unger L., Venner M., Goepfert C., Monod M.
ISSN
1439-0507 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0933-7407
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
58
Numéro
4
Pages
233-238
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
We report a case of an outbreak of inflammatory dermatophytoses caused by Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii (formally Trichophyton mentagrophytes pro parte) that involved an infected horse, the owner and at least 20 students, staff and stablemen at a veterinary school in Bern (Switzerland) that presented highly inflammatory dermatitis of the body and the face. Transmission from human to human was also recorded as one patient was the partner of an infected person. Both the phenotypic characteristics and ITS sequence of the dermatophytes isolated from the horse and patients were identical, consistent with the conclusion that the fungus originated from the horse. Three infected persons had not been in direct contact with the horse. Although direct transmission from human to human cannot be ruled out, fomites were most likely the source of infection for these three patients. Inspection of the literature at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century revealed that this dermatophyte was frequently transmitted from horses to humans in contact with horses (stablemen, coachmen, carters and artillery soldiers). The rarity of the present case report at the present time is likely related to the transformation of civilisation from the nineteenth century to nowadays in Europe with the change of horse husbandry. In addition, the inadequate immune response of the horse and the high number of people in contact with it at the equine clinic may explain the exceptional aspect of this case report.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
18/04/2015 13:27
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 21:19
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