Effect of orthographic processes on letter identity and letter-position encoding in dyslexic children.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_C4B78D6DD4B8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effect of orthographic processes on letter identity and letter-position encoding in dyslexic children.
Périodique
Frontiers in Psychology
Auteur(s)
Reilhac C., Jucla M., Iannuzzi S., Valdois S., Démonet J.F.
ISSN
1664-1078 (Electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
3
Pages
154
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish. PDF type: ORIGINAL RESEARCHARTICLE
Résumé
The ability to identify letters and encode their position is a crucial step of the word recognition process. However and despite their word identification problem, the ability of dyslexic children to encode letter identity and letter-position within strings was not systematically investigated. This study aimed at filling this gap and further explored how letter identity and letter-position encoding is modulated by letter context in developmental dyslexia. For this purpose, a letter-string comparison task was administered to French dyslexic children and two chronological age (CA) and reading age (RA)-matched control groups. Children had to judge whether two successively and briefly presented four-letter strings were identical or different. Letter-position and letter identity were manipulated through the transposition (e.g., RTGM vs. RMGT) or substitution of two letters (e.g., TSHF vs. TGHD). Non-words, pseudo-words, and words were used as stimuli to investigate sub-lexical and lexical effects on letter encoding. Dyslexic children showed both substitution and transposition detection problems relative to CA-controls. A substitution advantage over transpositions was only found for words in dyslexic children whereas it extended to pseudo-words in RA-controls and to all type of items in CA-controls. Letters were better identified in the dyslexic group when belonging to orthographically familiar strings. Letter-position encoding was very impaired in dyslexic children who did not show any word context effect in contrast to CA-controls. Overall, the current findings point to a strong letter identity and letter-position encoding disorder in developmental dyslexia.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 0:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:40
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