Apport iode et prevalence du goitre chez les adolescents dans le canton de Vaud. [Iodine nutrition and prevalence of goiter in adolescents in the Canton of Vaud]

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C4625989B71E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Apport iode et prevalence du goitre chez les adolescents dans le canton de Vaud. [Iodine nutrition and prevalence of goiter in adolescents in the Canton of Vaud]
Périodique
Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift
Auteur(s)
Fleury  Y., van Melle  G., Woringer  V., Temler  E., Gaillard  R. C., Portmann  L.
ISSN
0036-7672 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/1999
Volume
129
Numéro
47
Pages
1831-8
Notes
English Abstract
Journal Article --- Old month value: Nov 27
Résumé
Iodine deficiency disorders virtually disappeared in Switzerland after iodized salt was introduced in 1922 and the iodine content increased from 3.75 to 7.5 mg/kg in 1962 and to 15 mg/kg in 1980. However, a decreasing iodine intake has recently been reported again. The status of iodine nutrition in the Canton of Vaud was therefore assessed in 348 representative adolescents aged 11 to 17 years from the urban area of Lausanne in 1995. Thyroid size was estimated by inspection and palpation and thyroid volume measured by ultrasonography. Iodine concentration was determined in urine. Thyroid enlargement, as assessed by clinical examination, was found in 15% of the adolescents (stage 1a: 12.9%, 1b: 1.8%, 2: 0.3%), but its positive predictive value was low. The goitre prevalence determined by ultrasonography was only 1.4%. In addition, 4% of the adolescents had nodular or diffuse echo-structure abnormalities. Percentiles of thyroid volume as a function of sex, chronological age and body surface area were lower than WHO reference values. Median iodine concentration in urine was 92 micrograms/l (56.6% < 100 micrograms/l), slightly below WHO recommendations. Iodized cooking salt was consumed by 82% of the adolescents. In conclusion, the adolescents living in the Canton of Vaud had a low normal iodine intake with subclinical thyroid abnormalities. These findings support the recent decision to increase the salt iodine content to 20-30 mg/kg in order to prevent iodine deficiency during puberty and pregnancy. Percentiles of thyroid volume determined in the present study can be used as local reference.
Mots-clé
Adolescent Child *Diet Female Goiter/*epidemiology Humans *Iodine/deficiency/urine Nutritional Requirements Predictive Value of Tests Pregnancy Puberty Switzerland/epidemiology Thyroid Gland/anatomy & histology/ultrasonography
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
15/02/2008 17:57
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:39
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