Dynamic models of viral replication and latency.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_C16EF39F0B8F.P001.pdf (297.18 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_C16EF39F0B8F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Dynamic models of viral replication and latency.
Périodique
Current Opinion in Hiv and Aids
Auteur(s)
Mohammadi P., Ciuffi A., Beerenwinkel N.
ISSN
1746-6318 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1746-630X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
10
Numéro
2
Pages
90-95
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublishDocument type : review
Résumé
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: HIV targets primary CD4(+) T cells. The virus depends on the physiological state of its target cells for efficient replication, and, in turn, viral infection perturbs the cellular state significantly. Identifying the virus-host interactions that drive these dynamic changes is important for a better understanding of viral pathogenesis and persistence. The present review focuses on experimental and computational approaches to study the dynamics of viral replication and latency.
RECENT FINDINGS: It was recently shown that only a fraction of the inducible latently infected reservoirs are successfully induced upon stimulation in ex-vivo models while additional rounds of stimulation make allowance for reactivation of more latently infected cells. This highlights the potential role of treatment duration and timing as important factors for successful reactivation of latently infected cells. The dynamics of HIV productive infection and latency have been investigated using transcriptome and proteome data. The cellular activation state has shown to be a major determinant of viral reactivation success. Mathematical models of latency have been used to explore the dynamics of the latent viral reservoir decay.
SUMMARY: Timing is an important component of biological interactions. Temporal analyses covering aspects of viral life cycle are essential for gathering a comprehensive picture of HIV interaction with the host cell and untangling the complexity of latency. Understanding the dynamic changes tipping the balance between success and failure of HIV particle production might be key to eradicate the viral reservoir.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/03/2015 19:22
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 21:07
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