Association Between Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Brain Lesions and Long-term Caregiver Burden.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C0D4E0E6E8FE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Association Between Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Brain Lesions and Long-term Caregiver Burden.
Périodique
The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation
Auteur(s)
Guevara A.B., Demonet J.F., Polejaeva E., Knutson K.M., Wassermann E.M., Grafman J., Krueger F.
ISSN
1550-509X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0885-9701
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
31
Numéro
2
Pages
E48-58
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To investigate the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related brain lesions and long-term caregiver burden in relation to dysexecutive syndrome.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
A total of 256 participants: 105 combat veterans with TBI, 23 healthy control combat veterans (HCv), and 128 caregivers.
Caregiver burden assessed by the Zarit Burden Interview at 40 years postinjury.
Participants with penetrating TBI were compared with HCv on perceived caregiver burden and neuropsychological assessment measures. Data of computed tomographic scans (overlay lesion maps of participants with a penetrating TBI whose caregivers have a significantly high burden) and behavioral statistical analyses were combined to identify brain lesions associated with caregiver burden.
Burden was greater in caregivers of veterans with TBI than in caregivers of HCv. Caregivers of participants with lesions affecting cognitive and behavioral indicators of dysexecutive syndrome (ie, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) showed greater long-term burden than caregivers of participants with lesions elsewhere in the brain.
The TBI-related brain lesions have a lasting effect on long-term caregiver burden due to cognitive and behavioral factors associated with dysexecutive syndrome.

Mots-clé
Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Aged, Brain Injuries, Traumatic/diagnostic imaging, Brain Injuries, Traumatic/psychology, Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy, Caregivers/psychology, Case-Control Studies, Cost of Illness, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Time Factors, Veterans
Pubmed
Création de la notice
26/04/2016 17:51
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:35
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