Proportion of out-of-hospital adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C0742ED550DC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Proportion of out-of-hospital adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure.
Périodique
Emergency Medicine Journal
Auteur(s)
Dami F., Rossetti A.O., Fuchs V., Yersin B., Hugli O.
ISSN
1472-0213 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1472-0205
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Numéro
9
Pages
758-760
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: To measure the proportion of adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure to an emergency medical dispatch centre and to record whether known epileptic patients present cardiac or respiratory arrest together with seizure.
METHODS: This 2-year prospective observational investigation involved the collection of tape recordings of all incoming calls to the emergency medical dispatch centre, in which an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure was the chief complaint in patients >18 years, in addition to the paramedics' records of all patients who presented with respiratory or cardiac arrest. The authors also recorded whether the bystander spontaneously mentioned to the dispatcher that the victim was known to have epilepsy.
RESULTS: During the 24-month period, the call centre received 561 incoming calls for an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure in an adult. Twelve cases were classified as cardiac or respiratory arrest by paramedics. In one case, the caller spontaneously mentioned that the victim had a history of epilepsy. The proportion of cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure was 2.1%.
CONCLUSION: Although these cases are rare, dispatchers should closely monitor seizure patients with the help of bystanders to exclude an out-of-hospital cardiac or respiratory arrest, in which case the dispatcher can offer telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation advice until the paramedics arrive. Whenever the activity of the centre allows it and no new incoming call is on hold, this can be achieved by staying on the line with the caller or by calling back. A history of epilepsy should not modify the type of monitoring performed by the dispatcher as those patients may also have an arrest together with seizure.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
23/08/2012 10:30
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 21:05
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